+420 224 233 302
Talk to an expert
Currency:
EUR

WE’RE READY TO ASSIST YOU
We’re here to reply to your questions about VIZIT EUROPE’ vacation packages as well as any of our current deals to offer. Please fill out contact information below and our manager will contact you as soon as possible. If you need an answer right away just call us at +420 224 222 846












Contact me(Guaranteed call back in 4-8 hours!)

Your personal information will be used solely for purposes of responding to your request and to provide you with updates and information. Additional information is available in our Privacy Policy.

Thank you for your request.
We will answer in 4-8 hours

Enter login and password to sign in




Sign in
Don't have an account yet?
Sign up

Forgot your password?
Restore password

Sights

While most visitors to the Netherlands (often referred to as Holland) focus on Amsterdam, the country's vibrant capital with its great museums and art galleries, there are many charming towns and villages in this small yet fascinating country to explore. And because the country is so flat, it's extremely easy to do at least a little sightseeing the Dutch way: by bicycle. Many communities actively encourage the use of pedal-power and provide bikes to explore the sights at no cost. However you choose to see the Netherlands, you're guaranteed a great time in one of the friendliest and most liberal cultures in Europe.

Amsterdam canal ring
The city old centre is formed from canal rings, which give you the feeling of space, freedom and peace. Walk through these canal streets or better – take a trip with a boat by boarding one of the tourist cruises or by renting the boat yourself. Anther way to explore the Venice of the North is to take a ride on a bicycle. Any way you decide for – enjoy this city, one of the most beautiful in the world. If you like boats there is also a large upcoming event about historical sail ships called Amsterdam SAIL.
Boijmans-van Beuningen
Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, one of the Netherlands' most important art establishments, is known around the world for its superb collections of paintings, sculptures, and applied and decorative arts from across Europe. Painters of the 14th to 16th centuries are particularly well represented, with works by Hubert and Jan van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, and Pieter Bruegel the Elder. The 17th century is represented by Rembrandt and Rubens (26 of the latter's works can be viewed), while later centuries are represented by Monet, Gauguin, and Van Gogh. Contemporary painters represented include Picasso, Matisse, and Chagall. Another museum of note is the Wereldmuseum Rotterdam, an ethnographic museum established in 1883 with excellent displays of artifacts from ancient and modern cultures from around the world.
Grote of Sint-Laurenskerk
Great St. Lawrence Church - Grote of Sint-Laurenskerk - is all that's left of Rotterdam's medieval buildings, most of which were destroyed during WWII. In Grote Kerkplein, Sint-Laurenskerk dates from the 15th century and was built on once marshy ground giving the building a peculiar lean that was only halted after its foundation was rebuilt in 1650. Upon entering the church, you'll be struck by the beauty of the bright interior, an effect heightened by the colored glass of its windows. The church is famous for its three Danish organs, the largest of which stands on a marble base on the inside wall of the tower. The bronze doors of the main entrance, on the theme of War and Peace, are by the Italian artist Giacomo Manzu, and in front of the church is a statue of Rotterdam's most famous son, Erasmus. Guided tours and special tower climbs are available.
Ridderzaal: The Knights' Hall
At the east end of the Binnenhof's central courtyard, the 13th-century Knights' Hall (Ridderzaal) is a spectacular historic building still used for state receptions and the opening of parliament each September. This large Gothic hall - it measures 40 meters by 20 meters - boasts many magnificent stained glass windows depicting the coats of arms of Dutch towns, as well as the spectacular Rose Window with the arms of the principal noble families of the Netherlands. The heavy timber roof structure with its 18-meter-long beams has the appearance of an upturned ship, and carved wooden heads symbolizing eavesdroppers from the "higher powers" are supposed to deter members of the assembly from lying. Originally built as a banqueting hall, it later served as a market, a promenade, a drill hall, a playground, and even a hospital before being restored in 1904.
Rijksmuseum
The spectacular Rijksmuseum (aka the Dutch National Museum) in Amsterdam has been collecting rare art and antiquities since 1809. Not surprisingly, its extensive collection today amounts to nearly seven million works of art, including 5,000 paintings in more than 250 rooms, as well as a vast library with some 35,000 books. Apart from its unique collection of old masters, it offers an exhaustive account of the development of art and culture in the Netherlands and is especially rich in traditional Dutch handicrafts, medieval sculpture, and modern art. Be prepared to spend the best part of a day - or longer - exploring this museum's endless treasures.
The Binnenhof
In the center of the oldest section of The Hague is the Binnenhof - the Inner Court - an irregular group of buildings constructed around a large central courtyard. With its origins dating back to 1250 and tied to the building of a castle, it soon became the residence of the ruling aristocracy and today houses both chambers of Parliament. The most important buildings of the complex are the exquisite Ridderzaal, or Knights' Hall (see below for more details), still used for functions and receptions, and in the North Wing, the chamber is the official residence of the Prime Minister. Also important are the Rolzaal court house dating from 1511 and the Lairessezaal with its 17th-century paintings by Gerard de Lairesse. Other highlights include the First Chamber, notable for its painted medallions depicting statesmen and the portrait of King William II under the country's coat of arms. The Second Chamber - the legislative authority that watches over the government - sat in the former ballroom from 1815 until 1992.
Van Gogh Museum
As befits one of the world's greatest artists, the spectacular Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is ranked an impressive 35th in the top art museums globally, attracting almost 1.5 million visitors each year. Home to the world's largest collection of Van Gogh paintings -many donated by the artist's family - this impressive gallery and museum was specially built to showcase the more than 200 paintings, 500 drawings, and 700 letters in its vast collection. Works by his contemporaries are also on display. If you're only able to visit one of the many excellent art museums in the Netherlands, make it this one.
Up